I agreeto Idea Take pedestrians seriously and design streets for them
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Idea#134

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Take pedestrians seriously and design streets for them

Everyone walks (or rolls). Everyone needs good pedestrian access, whether you're taking a car, a bus or a bike. The city should design streets and intersections and sidewalks to give pedestrians a comfortable, easy walking experience.

Response: We agree completely. We will continue implement pedestrian friendly designs in City of Madison projects and will continue to be receptive to new ideas and technologies when they become available. Agreed, multimodal users are an important consideration in all Public Works transportation projects.

Submitted by Community Member 11 months ago

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(latest 20 votes)

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  1. Status Changed from In Review to In Progress
    5 months ago
  2. Status Changed from Active to In Review
    10 months ago
  3. The idea was posted
    11 months ago

Comments (12)

  1. Ideas on how to do this would be great. This is a very broad suggestion.

    11 months ago
    0 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
    1. Community Member Idea Submitter

      I would look at wait times to cross the street, timing the walk lights longer so a slow pedestrian (think: senior citizen) can cross without being afraid, wider and better marked crosswalks, more "yield to pedestrians" signs, more raised crosswalks, diagonal crossings at heavily used intersections, wider sidewalks, benches, bumpouts or pedestrian islands to decrease crossing distances, lower speed limits and design speeds for streets, and similar measures. The holy grail would be evaluating streets on the level of service provided to pedestrians in addition to the level of service provided to cars (which is how they are evaluated now).

      11 months ago
      5 Agreed
      0 Disagreed
    2. In London they don't have the concept of pedestrian right of way except in certain designated areas (zebra crossings). We have crosswalks to encourage crossing the street at the end of a block rather than darting out between cars, but perhaps every two or three blocks they could designate certain crosswalks as zebra crossings with additional paint/signs/lights to warn drivers to slow down. This way anybody who wants to cross a busy street that doesn't necessarily have stoplights can do so with less fear of getting struck while using a proper crosswalk.

      11 months ago
      0 Agreed
      0 Disagreed
  2. 1. Eliminate necessity to push buttons to activate walk light "permission."

    2. Failing that, place buttons so users, particularly bicyclists, can reach them WHEN RIDING ON THE %$#@*$‡› RIGHT! Atwood/Division and Wilson/Williamson/Blair/Johen Nolen, I am talking to you! {Blow that intersection up and start over, Tobacco Road style?]

    3. Shorten 2-minute waits for pedestrians on State Street at Gorham and Johnson.

    4. Convert all stops for cyclists on designated bike paths to "Yield" and then enforce THAT with police presence and warnings or tickets for the stubborn.

    5. Failing that, convert all stops for cyclists on designated bike paths at streets which are not "salt routes" (major arterials) to "Yield."

    6. Prioritize snow and particularly ice clearance at sidewalk intersections and bus stops on said salt routes' intersections, no matter what property owners (fail to) do.

    11 months ago
    2 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
    1. Some of those push buttons are impossible to reach from a wheelchair in the winter.

      11 months ago
      4 Agreed
      0 Disagreed
  3. I would be happy if motorists just obeyed the posted speed limit. We've had ticketing on our street, mounted horse patrol to slow down traffic, traffic islands have been installed. There are marked cross walks as well none are doing much good but I appreciate the effort. Our street is posted as 25 mph but is designed more like a 35 to 45mph since its a straight shot, nice and wide with a hill at the top drivers think they can zip through. Add the pedestrian / car accidents and near misses. Its a problem.

    11 months ago
    1 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
  4. Pedestrian-friendly streets are fundamental to our civic life. As Jane Jacobs argued decades ago, every incremental accommodation made to private vehicular traffic erodes walkability. As people find it less and less appealing to be on our streets, they become dead zones (Detroit is an extreme example of this phenomenon). Pedestrian-friendly streets keep downtowns and neighborhoods alive, benefiting all of us who live here.

    11 months ago
    2 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
  5. streets and crossings must be safe for pedestrians, but not all of us can walk

    10 months ago
    1 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
  6. Many of us our independent persons, but must rely on mobility chairs, hand wheelchairs, walkers, crutches, canes...and with aging, a person's muscle become weaker, so side=walks ,inter=section stop n go lights, are a real concern. As are inattentive drivers.

    10 months ago
    1 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
  7. One more thing about disabled persons, cross walk push buttons are inacessable at many intersections.

    10 months ago
    1 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
  8. A good approach is Complete Streets being adopted around the country. Complete Streets ordinances set guidelines for accommodating all users including pedestrians. - http://www.smartgrowthamerica.org/complete-streets - WisDOT has a complete streets policy and LaCrosse County adopted a CS ordinance.

    10 months ago
    0 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
  9. Also support my idea: Recruit volunteers to clear snow at crosswalks for disabled

    http://madison.ideascale.com/a/dtd/Recruit-volunteers-to-clear-snow-at-crosswalks-for-disabled/474649-22860

    10 months ago
    0 Agreed
    1 Disagreed